Ask The Brain: Should I Use This Study Aid?

I am your brain. Yup, that’s me, the three pound chunk of tissue floating inside your skull. I hold all of your darkest thoughts and your deepest secrets (don’t worry, I won’t tell), and I control almost all of your movements. Right now, I’m talking to you through this computer screen. Or, wait, aren’t you technically talking to yourself? Whatever. Right now, I’m making your eyes move so that they look at the letters on the screen, quickly processing each word, and talking to other parts of myself so that everything you’re reading makes sense. Make sense?   I’m pretty complex, and I do a lot for you, so that life seems nice and easy. But, I’m also pretty sensitive — I can only do so much without being taken care of once in awhile! Let’s take finals week, for example. I know, it’s a tough time for you with an exam everyday but, trust me, it’s a tough time for me too. The endless memorization and the sleepless nights take a huge toll on me. And don’t get me started on all the caffeine! Too much of that stuff makes me crazy.   I get it though. You need all those study aids — whether it’s caffeine, music, or even prescription drugs — to get through tough exam weeks. But, too much of anything can be bad. Let me...

8 Life Hacks To Help Busy Students Do It All

It’s hard to get everything done, I know. What with studying, going to class, seeing friends, remembering to shower, eating sometimes, and saving the world from villains, it’s easy to get overwhelmed. Wait, we’re not superheroes. No one can do all of that, but that doesn’t mean you can’t try. Here’s some hacks from my own experiences to help you get all that you want out of life.   1. Use an agenda. Seriously, use a really, really big agenda. For the first 20 years of my life, I had no appreciation of what a glorious tool an agenda can be, but now I have seen the light. Having an agenda can be so essential that you just may not know how you were able to function without it. Top it off with a variety of highlighters, and you’ll never forget to do something ever again.   The secret to getting the most out of your agenda is writing everything down. EVERYTHING. Have a regularly scheduled class? Write it down. Want to study specific book sections on a certain day? Write it down. Have a bill due? Write it down. Getting lunch with a friend? Write it down. EVERYTHING. WRITE IT DOWN. Highlight each event with a coded color scheme for easy identification and cross it out with a single line when complete so you can still refer back...

So, You Want To Be A Research Clinician?

  Stay Current To be competitive in the medical research arena, it’s essential to keep up to date with the current research. Read as much as you can about current research that is coming out, not just in your own field of interest, but also in breaking medical and technology news. Use these strategies from The Almost Doctor’s Channel’s guide to Staying Up to Date on Research in Your Field to keep the news and information flowing straight to your newsfeed.   Publish or Perish Start writing now. Write Letters to the Editors of peer-reviewed journals if you read something that piqued your interest. Get involved in student publications or online blogs. You can even send emails to authors whose research you’re interested in, as this information is often published along with their work. Getting your name out there, and having it show up on a Google search, will prove that you are not only dedicated to medicine, but that you’re able to write about it too.   Cultivate Mentors and Collaborators Make connections with everyone around you. Attend Office Hours, meet with your advisors and find out the special interests of not just your professors, but their RAs and TAs too. Connect with your peers. While medical school can, at times, be ultra-competitive, someday you will all be doctors and you never know who might end up in...

QUIZ: The Link Between Medicine and Music

Aside from the health benefits of listening to your favorite tunes, there are plenty of links between medicine and music. There’s a long history of band names, song themes and product marketing drawing inspiration from medical terms – this quiz tests how much you’ve been paying attention. Are you a music trivia genius? A medical fact repository? A healthy mix of both? Let’s find out! Test your knowledge on music medicine! The Ultimate Medicinal Music Test Which rock duo recorded the bluesy indie hit “Girl, You Have No Faith in Medicine”? What was Robert Palmer suffering from when he sang “Doctor, doctor, give me the news…”? Which dental anaesthetic did alt-rockers Eels think would sooth their soul in 1996? What was the name of the 2009 Marrow track released via a USB shaped like a pill container? Which Gregory Isaacs song shares its name with a popular cold & flu brand? Can you name the 80s band that took their name from the stimulant Dextroamphetamine? In 2017, Dexter Holland gained a PhD for his HIV research; which famous pop-punk band does he sing for? Which beloved rock star famously finished a full set after he fell from the stage and broke his leg in 2015? What percentage of different humans’ brains respond exactly the same way to musical stimulus? Diagnosis: One Hit Wonder Better luck next time. Either you’re not...

The Dark Side of Blood Thinners: What Side Effects Can the Drugs Cause?

What are blood thinners you may ask? They are a type of medication, formulated to keep one’s blood from clotting or prevent an existing clot from increasing in size. In that, it can either be antiplatelet or anticoagulant. Each form of drug works differently from the other. For instance, an antiplatelet, e.g., aspirin, blocks the release of thromboxane. It is a hormone that initiates clumping of the blood, which may result in clotting. On the other hand, anticoagulants, interfere with the production of proteins, in the blood. If you are given blood thinner prescription, you should take caution by sticking to it just as you would to the guidelines of a nursing personal statement. Situations where your doctor may prescribe a blood thinner include: • To reduce the risk of blood clots after a surgery • People with congenital heart defect • Those that suffer from valve or heart diseases • If you had a replacement of a heart valve Side Effects of Blood Thinners When used in the correct dosage, blood thinners are effective in preventing blood from clotting. A blood clot can lead to life-threatening blockages, heart attacks, and even strokes. However, blood thinners also come with side effects and risks, such as: a. Prolonged bleeding If you are taking blood thinners and by an unfortunate event, get wounded, a minor wound, wound would take some time...

Using Geological Mapping to Sketch the Human Body

Jeroen Tromp, PhD, Associate Director of the Princeton Institute for Computational Science and Engineering, and Professor of Geosciences and Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University, has been leading a team of scientists in research that translates modern geological mapping technology to the imaging of the human body. The same computational algorithms Prof. Tromp’s team pioneered in the measurement of seismic waves are being applied to ultrasonic waves used in medical imaging. The algorithms compare wave models with actual wave measurement data and extrapolates a much-improved 3D model compared with current standards. This technique offers much more information than a standard ultrasound image, but without the additional cost and burden of MRI scans. Click here to read more about this research on Princeton Invention. This new technology transforms traditional ultrasound images into three-dimensional images that could improve the diagnosis of tumors, osteoporosis and other disorders. It combines recent advances in computational power with techniques originally developed for the study of earthquakes and subterranean structures. Now they are applying the same techniques to ultrasonic waves, which share many of the same characteristics. Today’s ultrasound imaging devices work by sending sound waves through the body and constructing an image from the waves that bounce off internal...

This Isn’t Your Average Toy – The Mine Kafon

Inspired by the makeshift wind-powered toys of his Afghan childhood, Massoud Hassani is on the verge of something special.   The Mine Kafon is a low-cost wind-powered mine detonator with the appearance of a giant, spiky-armed tumbleweed. Check out his Kickstarter campaign. As a child living in war-torn Afghanistan, Massoud Hassani was well acquainted with the devastating nature of war and the long, perhaps endless road to recovery. Landmines concealed underground are a ubiquitous threat to countless communities in Afghanistan. A report from the Electronic Mine Information Network states that “over one million Afghans (3.7% of the total population) live within 500 meters of landmine contaminated areas.” Growing up, Hassani was a tinkerer; of particular interest to him was the creation of wind-powered toys, which he would race with other children in the windy, desert outskirts of Kabul. His interest in engineering led him to pursue a degree at the Design Academy Eindhoven.   Out of this tumultuous past sprung the idea for the Mine Kafon, a wind-powered mobile constructed from biodegradable plastic and bamboo. Hassani’s creation has caught the eyes and imaginations of many, and the prototype has been exhibited all across the globe. It was exhibited by The Museum of Modern Art in March of 2013.   Featured image is a screenshot from the video...

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