5 Ways VuMedi and The Doctor’s Channel Can Help You Become A Better Doctor

    VuMedi and The Doctor’s Channel are video education websites for physicians, fellows, residents, or members of the allied health community. The main difference between the two websites is that VuMedi is restricted to members of the allied health community and to use the site, you must sign up for an account. According to VuMedi, over 100,000 doctors use the website for education and improving their practice and patient care. However, you do not have to make an account to access The Doctor’s Channel.   How can these websites help you as a medical student and future physician? 1.Watch surgical videos.  Are you studying a specific topic right now where watching a surgical video would help? Or are you on your surgery rotation?  The specialties on VuMedi include anesthesiology, cardiovascular, dental, neurosurgery, oral maxillofacial, orthopaedics, pediatrics, plastic surgery, podiatry, primary care, radiology, and urology. There are often videos of different approaches for the same surgical technique. Watching these surgical videos could help you understand the differences between the approaches. The Doctor’s Channel offers short informative videos on a variety of topics, including cutting edge research, case studies, and pretty much any specialty you can think of. If you need to know information about a topic, the Doctor’s Channel might be a better choice for a video.   2. Watch presentations conducted by the world renowned physicians.  In addition to...

How “The Memory Palace” Will Help You Reach Med School Glory

Let’s face it. We’re not getting any younger any time soon, and same goes for our memories. But this one ancient technique may be able to rectify the squishy situation in our heads. Deemed the ‘memory palace’ by a Greek lyric poet, Simonides, this technique involves using a visual set of mnemonics that were widely used in oral societies for hundreds of years. In fact, it is the same technique Cicero used to memorize his famous speeches. Here’s a quick guide on how to use “The Memory Palace” to create a “journey” of information:   Here’s a more in depth look at the science behind the memory palace and how to develop your very own memory palaces:   Here’s a Ted Talk with Joshua Foer, a science journalist who trained himself to win the 2006 USA Memory Championships:   Featured image from Flickr | LOLO13500  ...

My Personal Story on Story-telling in Medicine

An American poet and political activist, Muriel Rukeyser, said the universe is made of stories, not of atoms. I believe her. As a seasoned storywriter and storyteller, I walked gingerly into the Adult Emergency Services for my first shift as a volunteer at a legendary New York City public hospital. I sported a crisply ironed red polo with “Emergency Department Volunteer” embroidered in white stitch. Armed with a pocket notebook and a pen to tie up my hair, I was ambivalent and apprehensive to perform alongside my colleagues: focused pre-medical students in rapacious pursuit of the coveted MD degree. My instrument of choice was a writing utensil, so it is with good reason I shivered at the thought of nearing a stethoscope or a scalpel. I suffered from an incurable case of imposter syndrome; I feared someone would detect that I was better at languages than logarithms. Qu’est-ce que c’est Organic Chemistry? That was a foreign language to me. I feared for my life and for the life of the patients I was about to meet. I wondered and worried how I — a hesitant traveler following a circuitous path toward a healthcare career— managed to get myself in a prestigious summer program and in the hustle and bustle of one of the nation’s busiest EDs. To the house staff, I thought I could contribute nothing more than open-mindedness,...

The 8 Definitive Signs You Have Succumbed to Med School Senioritis

Senioritis. Post-Match aboulia. Whatever you want to call it, it’s the last few months before residency starts and you can’t seem to focus on anything but serially liking selfies on Facebook. Though your body seems to be showing up for rounds every weekday, your brain has already checked out of med school. Here are 8 signs you may be suffering from FYBIGMI: 1. Your notes have gotten progressively shorter, to the point of becoming incomplete sentences.   2. Your brown-nosing questions about why it’s important to get the critical view during a chole has been replaced by telling your attending a day-by-day account of your impending trip to Southeast Asia.   3. You don’t ask for time off anymore. While you walked on eggshells 3rd year trying to explain to your chief resident how you’ll regret missing that 50th lap appy due to getting your triennial pap exam, you’ve gotten to the point of saying “Hey, I won’t be coming in Thursday because of my 4:30 p.m. GYN appointment. See you later”.   4. The third year on your service fumbles with his words and is overcome with diaphoresis upon pimping during rounds, but you’ve perfected the art of “I don’t know” and throwing your hands up throughout the final year of med school.   5. When your attending/resident sends you home at 1:00 in the afternoon, you don’t beg to stay, just to...

25 Fun Facts About the Transition from Undergrad to Med School

1. Being a medical student is twice the work of being an undergrad and only half of the fun. No, I’m just kidding — it’s none of the fun. 2. I hope you like reading. Ha. Ha ha. Ha ha ha ha! Excuse me while I jump out of a high window with the five weighty text books I’ve been assigned this semester strapped to my torso. 3. You have no idea where the hell anything on your campus is except the two or three buildings you have class in and the hospital. 4. Despite what you may have learned as an undergrad, Thursday night is a weeknight. You’re expected to wake up early and get stuff done the next day and everything. Crazy, right? 5. You’re also expected to refrain from drinking Sunday through Wednesday unless you just finished a set of exams—including day drinking. Seriously. 6. There’s a good chance that you’re a commuter student. Enjoy lugging 60 lbs of text books with you every day and dealing with gas prices/parking/public transportation. Remember that you are paying exorbitant amounts of money for these privileges. 7. Believe it or not, you actually have high expectations for the rigor and quality of your classes. Having a half-witted, drooling simpleton for a teacher has lost a bit of its luster, even if they are an easy grader. You find yourself wondering, “What did I get from this class?...

Your Brain Explained in Numbers

Do you know how many neurons comprise your brain? How about how long the longest axon on land is? What about in underwater life? This infographic gives you all the numerically based information you need. Now go impress your neuro instructor.  ...

How Valuable is an MD, MBA?

Have an idea but not quite sure how to see it to fruition? Having an MD alone may be more useful than you think to complete the process! But an MBA can offer 4 crucial “C”‘s towards successful business tactics. Arlen Meyers, MD, MBA, President and CEO of Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, weighs in:    ...

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