How Do You Imagine Your Future Career As A Physician?

I’ve done it, you’ve done it, we’ve all done it. Lying down in bed at night right before you’re about to go to sleep, imagining your life after 15 years when you are an independent, practicing physician. We all know what it’s going to take to get there – working your butt off, passion for the field, etcetera etcetera. However, given the people of science that we are, it might be worthwhile to look at it from a more objective lens. In other words, here’s the question that I want to try to answer – what are the factors that contribute to the decision you make when choosing a specialty? Inside the OR vs. Outside the OR vs. Somewhere in the Middle I would encourage you to reference an earlier article I wrote where I described the process that every first year medical student should consider going through, trying to shadow in as many specialties as possible in order to figure out between medicine and surgery. In my opinion, this is the most important decision that you need to make while you are still in infancy for the long road ahead. If you like being in the OR and nothing else, then you should do something in surgery. If you can live without the OR, but still want to do something procedural, then you should look into something along...

Dr. Orthochick: Hip Dislocation

I was supposed to have a “research day” yesterday, which would have been really nice since Dr. Jewish emailed me to inform me that my whole “summary” section for my paper sucked and i had to redo it since it did not “emphasize the points of this paper or convince the orthopedic surgeon that this paper is in any way useful or relevant.” He also asked me if I wanted to help him with a project, which means I have 3 projects going and potentially 2 more starting soon. So yeah, a research day would have been nice and I would have actually used it to get research done, thankyouverymuch. As luck would have it, I had to cover a Dr. Grandpa case. It looked like a cool case, it was a hip replacement but the lady had a really deformed hip socket so it was going to be done a special way. The advantage to this is that it’s a cool case, the disadvantage is that I don’t get to do much. but I like hip replacements so OK, I’m cool with the whole thing. The surgery went fine and I ordered a postoperative xray to be done in the recovery room because that’s Dr. Grandpa’s MO. By that point it was around 10:30AM so I figured I could stick around and wait for the xray results and...

Why 4 Days Off A Month During Residency Isn’t Enough

During my Medicine rotations during med school and also during my Medicine intern year, we had four days off per month. I believe that’s the minimum that residencies are forced to provide. Maybe this makes me a delicate little snowflake, but I think 4 days off per month is nowhere near enough. Especially when the other 26-27 days of the month, you are waking up super early, leaving super late, and sometimes spending the night in the hospital. I remember one resident said she got a simple cold and it lasted for two months because she was so overworked that she couldn’t shake it. Is it any wonder residents are so burned out? There was one month during internship when I was feeling really depressed and burned out, and I was going into a stretch of working nearly two weeks nonstop with two overnights wedged in there. I asked my lovely (not) senior resident if there was any way I could have even a half day off in there. In retrospect, I’m embarrassed I asked because the answer was so obviously no. She let me have it: “If you get a day off, that means someone else has to cover for you!” The solution, in my mind, is that we need to train more physicians so the ones we have aren’t so overworked and miserable. Yet I doubt that...

Why Not To Go To Med School

So you’re interested in going to medical school. But maybe you shouldn’t. In this post, we’ll talk about reasons why not to go to medical school. Let’s start with why I wrote this post. This past week one of my classmates and I were talking about our plans for residency. I recently decided my future career (Internal Medicine) but he was much further from a decision. Instead, he says he was considering “selling out” and getting a consulting job. Now I’ve nothing against the consulting job. “But can you imagine going through 4 years undergrad, the freaking MCAT, and 4 years of med school (+ Step 1 and Step 2) just to end up in consulting?” This is why knowing if your reasons are authentic can save you a lot of trouble later on. But if your reasons correspond with one a few in this post, it may be reason to think on whether or not to go to medical school. So let’s get started.   “I Want To Help People” You may have read the headline and wondered why wanting to help people is a bad reason to go into med school. Well honestly it’s not a bad reason, it’s just too vague of a reason. Almost every pre-med says they want to go to med school to “help people”. But what does that mean? Why can’t you...

Why Did I Go To Medical School? (Is Your Reason Good Enough?)

Why should you go to medical school? Why did I go to medical school? I’ve been giving tips for the past two years about med school on this website and the Youtube channel. But I haven’t shared my own reason. If you’re struggling to solidify your reason or just want to hear a different perspective, then that’s what this post is. I’ll allow myself to be a little vulnerable and tell you why I decided to go into medical school. Also, I’ll talk about how you can know if you should go to medical school. How do you know if your reason to go into medical school is good enough? That’s what we’ll go over in this post! If you want a video format, then check out the following YouTube video! Be sure to subscribe to the channel if you want weekly tips! Why Did I Go To Medical School? This question came from a reader so thank you for asking. If you want me to answer your questions in a post or video form, comment below or reach out to via email or social media! Alright, so why did I go to med school? To keep it as short and sweet, my immediate family had a lot of chronic and acute illnesses. I was in and out of the hospital system and the clinics a lot when I...

When It’s OK to Cancel Your Residency Interview

I have a good friend who applied to plastic surgery for residency. As is often the case for plastics, he applied to all 70-something programs in the country. He was a competitive applicant and ended up receiving multiple interviews. One night as I sat watching Monsters, Inc. for the third time in a month (I applied for pediatrics), he was frantically trying to book a flight from St. Paul to San Antonio. As he began to realize that this would not be possible without the use of time travel, he asked me: “Dude, Is it OK to cancel some of these residency interviews?” From firsthand experience, I can say that the answer is yes. Before I canceled my first interview, I was nervous that I was either going to alienate the program, fall in love with the program after I cancelled, or both. I spoke with a program director at my home institution and he gave me the following pearls of wisdom: Research the program in depth before you cancel to help affirm your decision that you are not missing the program of your dreams. If it truly sounds like a program you would be happy at, then keep the interview, but be honest with yourself. If you’re considering canceling the interview in the first place, it’s probably not the program for you.   There’s a belief that scheduling...

Residency Interview Questions: What to Ask and How to Prepare

One of the most exciting, exhilarating, and expensive endeavors of fourth year is the interview trail, in which aspiring residents will visit countless programs across the country in order to demonstrate their merit as a potential incoming intern. The interview is not only a chance to demonstrate that you are in fact as good as or better than your paper application, but also an opportunity to determine fit – do you fit in with the program and does the program’s philosophy fit your aspirations? Although the interview process will seemingly become easier as you progress along the trail, it will also become repetitive. You’ll be faced with the same standard questions: “tell me about yourself,” “why do you want to be a(n) [insert specialty of choice here],” “tell me about your research,” “tell me about a time when [insert ethical scenario here],” “why do you want to come to our program,” and “what questions do you have for me?” If you’re like me, you’ll likely have difficulty with that last question because there is so much to ask, so much that I wanted to know about a program, yet so little understanding of a good question to ask. It’s important to remember that, once you are invited for the interview, you are qualified for the position. You have passed the screening process, and you have what it takes to...

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